Policy, Research & Politics

Las nuevas luchas de la vieja canción protesta

Del reguetón a Taylor Swift, música y política renuevan votos y  amplifican su poder de transformación social.

ABC

Kuwait: singer sentenced to two years in prison for ‘insulting the judiciary’

The Kuwaiti Appeals Court sentenced singer Khaled Al-Mulla to two years in prison for “insulting the judiciary” in a song which aired during a Ramadan television program, as reported by Al Khaleej Today.

Freemuse

'The way I am is an outrage': the Indigenous Brazilian musicians taking back a burning country

A vibrant underground of rap, metal, folk and more is thriving among Brazil’s embattled tribes, who are standing up to Bolsonaro’s environment policies.

The Guardian

Shut Up and Dance: the Hackney rap duo who raved against racism

By accelerating hip-hop breakbeats, and pouring the pain of bigotry and authoritarian rule into music, Carl ‘Smiley’ Hyman and Philip ‘PJ’ Johnson blazed a trail that led to rave and jungle.

The Guardian

Trump et la musique : histoire d'un fiasco de campagne

Si le locataire de la Maison Blanche a essayé, comme tous ses prédécesseurs, d'utiliser l'industrie musicale à son avantage, il a surtout suscité l'embarras plus qu'aucun autre.

Libération

Los días contados de la música urbana

El alucinante viaje de un concepto de espíritu ecléctico, sofisticado y vendedor que enalteció a la música negra, y su degradación acusado de racista y confuso.

La Tercera

From Biden to Hickenlooper, Dems dominate music in politics. But does it make a difference?

As they fight to be elected — or keep their seats of power — politicians this year are finding vastly different receptions to their musical strategies.

The Know

Beethoven Has a First Name

The past several decades have seen the world of American classical music reckoning with its racist and sexist history; as it has with many other areas of culture, that process has greatly accelerated over the past year.

Slate

The poetics and politics of rap music in the UK

As ever, rap at its most politically conscious becomes a mouthpiece for the voiceless, the marginal, those who contribute most productively in society but are rarely heard.

Oxford University Press


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