The Pointy End

Here’s what music sounds like through an auditory implant

These electronic devices are surgically implanted into the inner ear, converting the sound from the world into electrical signals that are sent through the auditory nerve to the brain.

The Conversation

Michael Jackson Fans Are Tenacious. ‘Leaving Neverland’ Has Them Poised for Battle.

A new documentary detailing allegations of sexual abuse has the pop star’s most activist supporters ready to jump on Twitter and YouTube to defend his name.

The New York Times

ENO to scale back on surtitles to appease ‘distracted’ audiences

English National opera is dropping surtitles for one performance per production in its forthcoming season.

The Stage

Listening to Music Impairs Creativity

New research suggests that background music, with or without lyrics, "consistently disrupts creative performance."

Pacific Standard

Musiciens : quitter la scène

Après des années sur la route et en studio, comment les musiciens gèrent-ils le moment où ils décident que la musique ne sera plus leur métier ? D’anciens rockeurs ou rappeur racontent leur vie d’après, une reconversion qui se fait parfois dans la douleur.

Libération

Thousands of people gather to sing terribly

Founders of the 'tuneless' choirs say the franchise is 'spreading like a rash' with 29 choirs across the country, and more set to open - filled with people who proudly sing badly.

AOL

From Soho to Paris, how migrant music brought two capitals to life

From the 1960s to the 1980s, music from afar united Paris and London in a vibrant cultural age. A new exhibition celebrates the era.

The Guardian

10 Takeaways From The 2019 Grammy Awards

We made it, everyone! This year's Grammy Awards telecast rolled past the three-and-a-half-hour mark with its share of controversies, but also served up a string of satisfying winners, memorable performances and a GIF sure to endure until roughly the moment life on earth is extinguished. Here are 10 takeaways from 2019's overstuffed and idiosyncratic Grammy Awards.

NPR

Un jeune sur deux écoute de la musique à des niveaux nuisibles

Environ 50% des jeunes de 12 à 35 ans, soit 1,1 milliard de personnes, risquent à terme de souffrir de pertes auditives en raison « d'une exposition prolongée et excessive à des sons forts », selon l'Organisation mondiale de la santé (OMS).

Futura Sciences


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