The Pointy End

Jazz and Classical Pianists Use Their Brains Differently

Great minds don’t necessarily think alike when tinkling the ivories.

Atlas Obscura

Perhaps music really is a universal language

New research finds we can often identify a song's intended purpose, even when it's a product of a distant culture.

Pacific Standard

Why Do Orchestras Seem to Play Behind the Beat?

If someone ever criticizes you for being slightly off the mark or slow to react, tell them you’re modeling your actions after those in professional orchestras.

WQXR

Why Is the Orchestra Seated That Way? An Explanation

Why don’t the oboes and tubas sit in the front of the orchestra? Why don’t flutes and first violins swap positions, or — in what would be the coolest configuration, let’s be honest — bass trombones and contrabassoons sit right up front with the conductor? Why is there even a conductor at all?

WQXR

Your brain responses to music reveal if you're a musician or not

How your brain responds to music listening can reveal whether you have received musical training, according to new research.

Science Daily

When Does Speech Become Music?

Most of us instinctively know when someone’s singing and when they’re talking. But since music and speech are both just sounds, how do our brains tell them apart?

BBC

Could chill-out music boost your post-workout recovery?

Many of us know that an upbeat playlist can help us power through a workout, but new research in the United Kingdom now suggests that what you listen to after your gym session could also boost post-exercise recovery.

Inquirer

Pourquoi vous mettre à la musique devrait être LA bonne résolution de l'année

Vous rêvez de vous lancer dans la pratique d'un instrument ou du chant, mais hésitez à franchir le pas ? Voici cinq arguments - science à l’appui - pour vous convaincre que la pratique musicale devrait être LA bonne résolution de l’année !

France Musique

Listen to Alan Turing’s First Computer-Generated Christmas Carols

In 1951, the BBC played two carols from Turing’s computer, which have now been recreated by New Zealand researchers

Smithsonian


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