The Pointy End

On "Adiemus" and the world's music

Karl Jenkins' "Adiemus" is apparently the most-performed piece of music in the world. A sweeping classical epic with vocals written in a mysterious imaginary language, it was composed for Delta Airlines, which wanted to copy British Airways' classic "Aria on Air" ad.

Boing Boing

Écouter de la musique pour un meilleur système immunitaire

Chanter serait bon pour le moral, et pour la santé. Une chercheuse britannique vient d’établir un lien direct entre la musique et le bon fonctionnement du système immunitaire.

Passeport Santé

'Jazz was the catalyst for change': Jim Marshall’s images of 60s festivals

Photographer Jim Marshall is known for iconic images of 60s rock stars. But his first great portraits were of the giants of jazz, captured on the eve of the civil rights era.

The Guardian

How Pop Culture Wore Out Leonard Cohen’s ‘Hallelujah’

Leonard Cohen’s ballad “Hallelujah” has become so inescapable that the songwriter once asked for a break from his own track. “I think it’s a good song, but too many people sing it,” he told the Guardian in 2009, agreeing with a critic who asked for “a moratorium on ‘Hallelujah’ in movies and television shows.”

The New York Times

Asteroid Freddiemercury and 12 other peculiar things named after pop stars

An asteroid has been named after the late great Queen singer Freddie Mercury to honour what would have been his 70th birthday on 5 September.

BBC

Careless whisker: Universal to release album for cats

They are a particularly tough audience – picky, moody, often impossible to please – but cats represent an untapped music market, according to one of the world’s biggest record labels.

The Guardian

Infographic: Musicians Killed by Guns

Guns. They’re the tragic link between John Lennon, Marvin Gaye, Kurt Cobain, Tupac and Biggie.

Medium

Is Pop Music Addicted to Hand Clapping?

Everyone knows how to clap their hands, but no one thinks clapping is cool.

Medium

What Killed the Jingle?

Marketing ditties once had a distinctive, hokey sound, but today’s advertisers have ditched them for standard pop songs.

The Atlantic


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