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Music the artform and artists

Why a Mughal-era instrument is fading from Pakistan’s music scene

Remarkable for its resemblance to a plaintive human voice, the classical instrument is fading from Pakistan’s music scene – except for a few players dedicated to preserving its place.

Al Jazeera

House music is alive and well in South Africa

In much of the world, house music has already had its day — but in South Africa, it is pop music. Here's why this musical genre has remained king.

NPR

Unique to Jakarta, centuries-old tambourine music returns with Ramadan

The sound of tambourines has returned to the narrow alleys of southern Jakarta after a long pandemic hiatus, marking the month of Ramadan with distinctive Islamic devotional music native to the Indonesian capital.

Arab News

The Surprising Influence of Classical in Metal Music

To most observers, the world of classical music and that of hard rock, particularly heavy metal, could not seem more disparate.

WQXR

Rock français, la carte jeune

Donné pour moribond, le rock fait son grand retour en France. Une nouvelle génération de groupes et de labels fleurit partout dans le pays. Reste à transformer le phénomène underground en succès commercial.

Libération

LCD Soundsystem: auge, desaparición y regreso de los rockeros intelectuales que se hicieron adultos en España

Esta historia comienza con una pastilla. La “Mitsubishi” que le ofrecieron a James Murphy en el club Vanity de Nueva York mientras pinchaba David Holmes, alrededor de 2001.

El País

A short history of electronic music

Where do you begin a history of electronic music and the synthesizer? The popular and somewhat easy view is that the two are entwined, that electronic music started with the invention of the synthesiser and its use in the 60s and 70s. But actually the synthetic manipulation of sound, and the machines that did it can be traced back further.

Music Radar

The Decline of Current Pop

There are a number of issues which periodically drive a shift in listening preference from new music to older music, but the key reason is when too much current pop sounds the same for too long.

Radio Info

Luigi Russolo’s Cacophonous Futures

What does the future sound like? In the early 20th century, one answer rang out from Luigi Russolo’s intonarumori — lever-operated machines designed to pop, sough, shriek, and shock.

The Public Domain Review


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