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Music the artform and artists

Remembering Pharoah Sanders, Who Sought Divinity on Earth

To hear Pharoah Sanders tell it, he spent his six-decade career reaching for something that was always just beyond him. From the ecstatic flights of his playing, and the sometimes explicitly religious iconography he employed to contextualize it, it is clear that the something he sought had a spiritual dimension.

Pitchfork

It’s not salsa or ranchera music – Latino punk rock in the US

Latino musical diversity is much more than indigenous, vernacular and regional music. Explorations of the Latino musical identity have delved into jazz, rock and beyond.

El País

How diverse music traditions have influenced Saudi Arabia’s identity and culture

Folk music traditions in Saudi Arabia are diverse and complex, combining distinctive tones, rhythms and melodies with poetry, percussion, and dances that have been passed down through generations.

Arab News

Soubi, la musique et la vie

Aux Comores, impossible de ne pas connaître le talent de ce musicien qui vibre et qui, à presque 65 ans, collabore tous azimuts et espère rencontrer le succès international pour enfin vivre de son art.

Pan African Music

La música en la antigua Grecia

Es admirada la cultura y el arte que nos dejaron los antiguos griegos. Pero ¿cómo era la música en la antigua Grecia?

Ok Diario

New York’s Hispanic influence

Recognized as the world’s cultural epicenter, much of New York City’s influence on popular music around the world comes from the Latinos that live and perform there.

El País

A lost Yiddish opera complete

How a composer, librettist and historian filled in the blanks on the missing masterpiece 'Bas Sheve'.

Forward

On the record

Can we really know what Enrico Caruso sounded like, from the records he made at the dawn of recordings, at the dawn of the twentieth century? We get a very helpful approximation. What our ears miss, our imaginations can fill in.

The New Criterion

The Monks Who Took the Kora to Church

Sixty years ago, a Senegalese monastery gave up the organ for the kora, a traditional calabash harp. The monks’ innovations brought the instrument to the world stage—and transformed sacred music.

The New Yorker


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